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Acetylcholine as a Neuromuscular Transmitter In the Horseshoe Crab, Limulus polyphemus Public

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Previous MQP studies on horseshoe crab muscles provided several lines of evidence that acetylcholine (ACh) is their neuromuscular junction (NMJ) transmitter. ACh blockers and acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies reduced responses to neuronally evoked contractions (Fuller, 2006; Mallozzi, 2005; Vacher, 2007). We used a histochemical approach to further confirm the presence of ACh and its receptor at NMJs. Whole mounts and acrylic-embedded sections were treated with antibodies that were fluorescent, enzymatic, or electron-opaque. Polyclonal anti-ACh confirmed the presence of ACh in horseshoe crab leg nerves. Monoclonal anti-AChR demonstrated anti-AChR in some nerves, though less strongly. Immunoelectron microscopy has produced confirmatory micrographs for ACh.

  • This report represents the work of one or more WPI undergraduate students submitted to the faculty as evidence of completion of a degree requirement. WPI routinely publishes these reports on its website without editorial or peer review.
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  • E-project-042810-171118
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  • 2010
Date created
  • 2010-04-28
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